Atlasbooks.com Publishers retailers Bookmasters.com

Google: Yahoo: MSN:


Contents

Dedication
i
Special Dedication
i
Introduction
1
Sandy Island
3
The Sandy Island Preserve
4
Gullah Settlements on Sandy Island
6
The Gullah People of Sandy Island
8
My Summers on Sandy Island
20
Other Stories
44
Days at Annie Village
46
Georgia Hill, Outside Annie Village
48
Hanging Out at Red Sand Hill
50
The Old Boat Dock
52
Dinners at Annie Village
55
The Pathways to Mt. Arena
56
Migration Away; California Living
63
Problems of The City
66
Reunions - Over the Years
69
Homecoming at Last
72
Goals and Objectives
83
A Knowledge of One's Culture is Essential
84
You Can Only Reap What You Have Sown
86
A New Generation on Timeline
88
Through the Long Day
90
This Feeling Within
98
A Renaissance
116
Journey By The Water's Edge
122
The River is Rising
124
The Law of Cause and Effect
125
Blow Gabriel Blow
127
The Twilight
131
Sandy Island Today - Still The Home of the Gullah People
137
The Art Insights of a Gullah Descendant
141
Secrets for Success
143
Practice Truth, Teach Truth, Know the Truth
145
The Dragon's Poison Bows
147
Children are Crying and Youngsters are Dying
150
Demons are Hibernating in Drugs and Alcohol
154
The Acquisition of Economic Skills
158
Be Prepared to Compete in the Global Arena
161
Practice Financial Accountability
165
That View of Life
170
Index
171

Excerpt

Introduction

The Gullah-Geechee culture is unique to the coastal areas and sea islands of the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida. It is known as Gullah in the Carolinas and as Geechee in Florida and Georgia. The Gullah-Geechee people are direct descendants of resident of West Africa's rice coast who were brought here as slaves to work the fertile coastal areas. When the captains of the slave ships brought Africans to America, they dropped many of their captives off at Charleston, S.C. which was America's largest slave marketing center in the 18th century. It has been estimated that over one third of Blacks can trace their history to the Charleston seaport.

Many of the slaves were taken to plantations on the isolated barrier islands off the South Carolina coast. Many of the plantations were rice plantations along the Waccamaw neck along the Waccamaw River. And even though stripped on their homeland and forced to live in isolated patches they continue to speak their language and retain their culture. The Gullah culture, handed down by West African slaves, is still alive on Sandy Island and the island communities along the South Carolina coast. For over 300 years the Gullah people have resided in these low lying isolated pockets. The lack of bridges to the island left the Gullah culture unspoiled and pristine with its dominant motherland influences. The isolation retained their distinct cultural differenced from mainland residents.

The Gullah people of today that reside on Sandy Island are direct descendants of the Gullah people who were brought here centuries ago. The Gullah people of today have maintained an ongoing fight to preserve their culture as handed down from generation to generation, and has a major impact on how they function as a group of people. Sandy Island is still pretty much isolated as there are no bridges to the island, and electricity didn't come to the island until 1967 and running water didn't come until 2001.

 

 

Search Categories | Featured Publishers | New Titles | eBooks | Author Spotlight | Reading Room | BookMasters | Home | Contact

AtlasBooks® is a Division of BookMasters®, Inc.
© Copyright 1997- 2012, All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy